the-fury-of-a-time-lord:

The Galileo episode is hands down my favorite, i think, because it shows that Old School Peebs does actually care for his boy. Mr. Peabody is sick, so Sherman has to do the show alone. I mean, LOOK AT THAT. He says that Sherman “is a dog’s best friend”, in a very soft tone. Very unlike him. but what’s most telling is that, unlike modern Peabody, he fully and completely trusts Sherman to not only operate the WABAC, but to go on an adventure without him. Sherman knows if he gets into trouble (and boy does he), he can run right back and ask Mr. Peabody for help. 
anyway. proof positive that Old School Peabody isn’t the giant jerk everyone thinks he is.

Naturally, I love the modern Peabody, but this post eloquently explains why the “Galileo” episode of Peabody’s Improbable History was such a huge standout!  I loved that episode.  (They should’ve had this on the “Best of” DVD set from a few years back!)  And that Sherman did a closing pun that actually made Mr. Peabody groan for once (or at least blow his nose like a tuba)!

the-fury-of-a-time-lord:

The Galileo episode is hands down my favorite, i think, because it shows that Old School Peebs does actually care for his boy. Mr. Peabody is sick, so Sherman has to do the show alone. I mean, LOOK AT THAT. He says that Sherman “is a dog’s best friend”, in a very soft tone. Very unlike him. but what’s most telling is that, unlike modern Peabody, he fully and completely trusts Sherman to not only operate the WABAC, but to go on an adventure without him. Sherman knows if he gets into trouble (and boy does he), he can run right back and ask Mr. Peabody for help. 

anyway. proof positive that Old School Peabody isn’t the giant jerk everyone thinks he is.

Naturally, I love the modern Peabody, but this post eloquently explains why the “Galileo” episode of Peabody’s Improbable History was such a huge standout!  I loved that episode.  (They should’ve had this on the “Best of” DVD set from a few years back!)  And that Sherman did a closing pun that actually made Mr. Peabody groan for once (or at least blow his nose like a tuba)!


Papa Wolf

I won’t give away the situation of this shot, but all I can say is that Mr. Peabody was so badass in this scene!

Papa Wolf

I won’t give away the situation of this shot, but all I can say is that Mr. Peabody was so badass in this scene!

clarabellums-art:


"Who are they, Mr. Peabody?"
"Sherman, isn’t it obvious?"

so guess which movie i have falLEN IN LOVE WITH

Awesome!  I love it.  :)

clarabellums-art:

"Who are they, Mr. Peabody?"

"Sherman, isn’t it obvious?"

so guess which movie i have falLEN IN LOVE WITH

Awesome!  I love it.  :)

giancarlovolpe:

A little behind the scenes look of the early stages of Green Lantern the Animated Series.

My eternal gratitude to everyone who helped prove the doubters wrong.

Beautiful.  Absolutely beautiful.

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - Clear SilhouetteSilhouette in character posing is crucial. It will make or break a design, storyboard or animated piece. Have a great Tuesday everyone!Norm*Message me for more suggestions on Tuesday Tips!

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - Clear Silhouette

Silhouette in character posing is crucial. It will make or break a design, storyboard or animated piece. Have a great Tuesday everyone!

Norm

*Message me for more suggestions on Tuesday Tips!

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - Push it!Clarity is probably the most important thing to think about at all time when boarding. Pushing your poses to an undeniable level of clarity will improve the clarity of the storytelling in general. Don’t leave space for uncertainty in posing out your characters. Your audience will be more engaged and entertained by the sequence.This is the last post for the Super Week. I hope you enjoyed it. Back on the regular schedule next week (Every Tuesday).Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - Push it!

Clarity is probably the most important thing to think about at all time when boarding. Pushing your poses to an undeniable level of clarity will improve the clarity of the storytelling in general. Don’t leave space for uncertainty in posing out your characters. Your audience will be more engaged and entertained by the sequence.

This is the last post for the Super Week. I hope you enjoyed it. Back on the regular schedule next week (Every Tuesday).

Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tip - Beat Boards / StoryboardsIt can be a daunting task to just “start storyboarding”. Because there’s so many things to think about when storyboarding, we all need a roadmap to know where we are going. Beat boards are not even the first step to creating a story, but it’s often the clearest way to pitch an early concept to someone. It’s also very useful to plan out the larger beats of a large physical sequence (action, chase, etc.). This way, you don’t have to go on a limb for a week or two and have to redo it all if it doesn’t work. They’re sort of like your Key Poses in animation, but put on a story scale. Does that make sense? Message me if you have any questions or suggestions about future posts.Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tip - Beat Boards / Storyboards

It can be a daunting task to just “start storyboarding”. Because there’s so many things to think about when storyboarding, we all need a roadmap to know where we are going. Beat boards are not even the first step to creating a story, but it’s often the clearest way to pitch an early concept to someone. It’s also very useful to plan out the larger beats of a large physical sequence (action, chase, etc.). This way, you don’t have to go on a limb for a week or two and have to redo it all if it doesn’t work. They’re sort of like your Key Poses in animation, but put on a story scale. Does that make sense? Message me if you have any questions or suggestions about future posts.

Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - No Straight LinesCurved lines > Straight lines. That’s it.Norm

A very fascinating approach to character construction!

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - No Straight Lines

Curved lines > Straight lines. That’s it.

Norm

A very fascinating approach to character construction!

the-great-mighty-dick:

been hearing a lot of complaints about the head and feet of the new godzilla so i fixed it
head was too small? bigger head
legs were too stocky? fuck em. who needs legs. tank treads
official design by the way, this might spoil the end of the movie

This guy just did the Godzilla version of Dinosaur Tank from Ultra Seven (Tsuburaya; 1967)!  LOL!

the-great-mighty-dick:

been hearing a lot of complaints about the head and feet of the new godzilla so i fixed it

head was too small? bigger head

legs were too stocky? fuck em. who needs legs. tank treads

official design by the way, this might spoil the end of the movie

This guy just did the Godzilla version of Dinosaur Tank from Ultra Seven (Tsuburaya; 1967)!  LOL!

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - FeetI don’t often have to draw bare feet, unless I’m doing Life Drawing. When storyboarding, the focus is generally not on the feet. They also are usually covered (shoes, socks), or just not shown on screen that much. Nonetheless, it’s important to understand their functionality and general appeal. Keep details to a minimum, unless the character uses its bare feet to grasp things or do things with them most humans don’t. The best example of pushing feet to an extreme degree of functionality would be Disney’s Tarzan (one of my all time favorite). Other than that, don’t draw too much attention to them, but find appeal in its shapes.Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - Feet

I don’t often have to draw bare feet, unless I’m doing Life Drawing. When storyboarding, the focus is generally not on the feet. They also are usually covered (shoes, socks), or just not shown on screen that much. Nonetheless, it’s important to understand their functionality and general appeal. Keep details to a minimum, unless the character uses its bare feet to grasp things or do things with them most humans don’t. The best example of pushing feet to an extreme degree of functionality would be Disney’s Tarzan (one of my all time favorite). Other than that, don’t draw too much attention to them, but find appeal in its shapes.

Norm